Spotlight: Malawi’s National Parks & Wildlife Reserves

Spotlight: Malawi’s National Parks & Wildlife Reserves

Although Malawi is a small, landlocked country, it is home to some of the most beautiful national parks and wildlife reserves in Southern Africa. Malawi’s ten parks and reserves contain more than 170 mammal species and 600 bird species, including the African “Big Five”—buffalo, elephant, lion, leopard and rhino. Whether by vehicle, foot or boat, each protected area offers a unique visit experience, breathtaking landscape and abundant wildlife. Together they showcase Malawi’s natural beauty and native biodiversity.

Today, three of Malawi’s national parks and reserves are managed by African Parks, a South Africa-based nonprofit organization that manages 14 million acres across ten protected areas in seven African countries. In the last 16 years, African Parks has done significant work to restore and transform Majete Wildlife Reserve, Liwonde National Park and Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve,  maintaining a strong focus on conservation, sustainability and economic development of surrounding communities. Learn more about these three parks and reserves below!

Tip: To make the most of your wildlife-viewing expedition, take into account the climate! The best time of the year to visit is the dry season (August to November). Some parks will be closed or impassable without a four-wheel drive vehicle during the rainy season (January to March).

Photo: Craig Hay and African Parks.

Photo: Craig Hay and African Parks.

Majete Wildlife Reserve

Location: Lower Shire Valley in southwest Malawi

Majete Wildlife Reserve is a unique conservation site with an incredible story of recovery, restoration and resilience. Previously, Majete struggled with ill-equipped and underfunded resources to prevent illegal land encroachment, causing the reserve size to diminish over time. However, in 2003, Majete became the first park to enter African Parks’ management portfolio. In partnership with the Malawian government and local communities, African Parks took responsibility for the rehabilitation and long-term management of the reserve. They began to revive the park through a series of species reintroductions and significant infrastructure development including an electric fence, water holes and an overhaul of law enforcement. After just 15 years, Majete transformed from a once-empty forest with no employment opportunities or tourism, to a productive and diverse haven for Africa’s most iconic wildlife.

The mass wildlife reintroduction to Majete began in 2003 ended in 2012. As a part of this process, 14 different species of animals, formerly native to the area, were brought to live in Majete. In addition to the Big Five, other animals reintroduced include eland, sable, waterbuck, nyala, hartebeest, impala, zebra, warthog and Majete’s first-ever giraffe population in 2018. Today, the total population of mammals is now more than 11,000. Majete is flourishing, so much so that the park uses its wildlife to populate other reserves in Malawi. The transformed reserve is now one of Malawi’s best for viewing wildlife by boat, vehicle or foot. 

Recent Highlights:

  • Maintained a 15-year track record of zero poaching of rhinos and elephants 

  • Tourism increased 14% from 2018, with 9,000+ visitors bringing USD $550,000 to the reserve and surrounding communities

  • Employment has increased in 2019 with 140 people now employed full-time within the park

Photo: African Parks.

Photo: African Parks.

Liwonde National Park

Location: Southern Malawi, near the Mozambique border and north of Blantyre

Although only 220 square miles, Liwonde is Malawi’s most popular national park, with beautiful riverine settings and large numbers of wildlife. The Shire River flows along the western border of Liwonde, offering enhanced wildlife viewing on boat safaris, on foot or in 4x4s. Wildlife species include elephants, hippos, crocodiles, antelopes, leopards, hyena and black rhino. In recent years, the park has also reintroduced lions and cheetahs.

Previously, Liwonde was fraught with environmental challenges, human-wildlife conflict, and suffered from some of the highest rates of poaching in Malawi. The South African-based NGO African Parks assumed management of the park in 2015. Since then, Liwonde has been home to landmark wildlife translocations and reintroductions. The new management immediately constructed an electric fence to keep the wildlife inside and illegal activity outside the park. In 2016, the park became the epicenter of one of the largest elephant translocations in history, with a total of 336 elephants relocated to Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve to help restoration efforts. Today, Liwonde offers a wealth of natural resources, community development and employment opportunities for more than 900,000 people living in its surrounding communities.

Recent Highlights:

  • Zero human fatalities since July 2016, following construction and maintenance of an electric fence around its perimeters

  • Translocated 336 elephants to Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve to restore the park and reduce human-elephant conflict in 2016

  • Reintroduced 7 cheetahs in 2017, the first to return to Malawi in 20 years. Cheetah population has doubled in size since

  • Reintroduced 10 lions in 2018 from Majete Wildlife Reserve after 10 years

  • Since 2016, tourism increased by 25% and revenue increased by 70%

Photo: Morgan Trimble / Getty Images.

Photo: Morgan Trimble / Getty Images.

Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve

Location: East of Central Malawi, near Lake Malawi

Nkhotakota is the largest and oldest wildlife reserve in Malawi, and the country’s closest example of untouched wilderness. With more than 700 square miles of rugged terrain and river crossings, most of the reserve is miombo woodland with large patches of tall grasses and a few areas of rainforest. In the past, the reserve was difficult to access due to its terrain, which in turn made animals difficult to find. In addition, decades of poaching and lawlessness reduced its animal population, leaving the reserve nearly empty by 2015.

Upon acquiring management rights to the reserve in 2015, African Parks made rapid progress to protect and further develop Nkhotakota. Starting in 2016, management facilitated one of the largest elephant translocations in history by  bringing 500 elephants from Liwonde National Park and Majete Wildlife Reserve to repopulate Nkhotakota. After a total influx of more than 1,500 large animals of various species, Nkhotakota established a fully-fenced sanctuary to ensure the long-term survival of all animals in the reserve.

Recent Highlights:

  • Completed fence in 2018 around a 47,000 acre sanctuary area in the core of the reserve to allow for the safe reintroduction of species

  • Reintroduced 500 elephants and 1,500 game animals from Liwonde National Park and Majete Wildlife Reserve to date

  • Communities and rangers now collaborate to collect hundreds of wire snares (used to catch animals) and bury pitfall traps to protect wildlife

  • More than 710 students from 22 different schools visited the reserve in 2017 as part of an environmental education program

Climate Change Impact on Lake Malawi

Climate Change Impact on Lake Malawi

In Malawi, climate change is negatively affecting economic growth, long-term prosperity and the livelihoods of an already-vulnerable population. According to a recent report by the World Bank, Malawi is among the top ten countries in Africa most at risk from climate change, with cyclones and floods among the major threats. Extreme weather threatens the region’s ecosystem and its fragile agriculture-based economy. Climate change severely affects Lake Malawi, home to more species of fish than any other freshwater body in the world. Unfortunately, decades of overfishing and resource exploitation continue to decimate this natural wonder, known by its moniker, the “Lake of Stars.” 

The third largest body of freshwater in Africa, Lake Malawi is a major regional food source and is crucial to the local economy. Bordering three countries - Malawi, Tanzania and Mozambique - Lake Malawi stretches across more than 11,000 miles and boasts a rich biodiversity of more than 1,000 species of fish. But in the past decade, receding water levels and dwindling fish stocks have taken a large toll. Fishing is the primary source of income for the lake’s shoreline villages, and with a 90% decline in fish stocks in the last two decades, people are seeing their livelihoods slip away.

Aerial view of fishing boats on the shore of Lake Malawi at the Senga village. (Photo: Gianluigi Guercia, Associated Foreign Press.)

Aerial view of fishing boats on the shore of Lake Malawi at the Senga village. (Photo: Gianluigi Guercia, Associated Foreign Press.)

In Senga Bay, a fishing village in the northern part of Lake Malawi, is just one example of a community whose economic well-being is highly dependent upon the well-being of the lake. As a result of declining fish stocks, fish is now more expensive, affecting roughly 14,000 people, who rely on fishing for income and sustenance.

Fishermen at Senga Bay work through their catch after returning to the shore of the Lake. (Photo: Gianluigi Guercia, Associated Foreign Press.)

Fishermen at Senga Bay work through their catch after returning to the shore of the Lake. (Photo: Gianluigi Guercia, Associated Foreign Press.)

Additionally, increasingly strong winds and unpredictable torrential rains make it more difficult for fishermen on the lake. According to USAID, the amount of rainfall incidents in the aid-dependent country is likely to decrease, but each rainfall will be more intense. Rainfall has a higher chance of leading to droughts and floods, as we saw earlier this year when Cyclone Idai hit southern Africa, claiming more than 1,000 lives and leaving thousands displaced.

As climate change intensifies, Raising Malawi is proud to support UNICEF Malawi in emergency response and meeting the humanitarian needs of families and children impacted by natural disasters. We applaud any and all efforts of citizens, community organizations, local government and NGOs to address the impact of climate change in the impoverished region.

2019 Malawi Tripartite Elections

2019 Malawi Tripartite Elections

In May, Malawi held its tripartite elections, with citizens voting for a new president, parliament and local government councillors. Approximately 5 million Malawians cast their ballots on May 21 in a closely-fought race. Peter Mutharika, the incumbent president and leader of the governing Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), won another 5-year term by a narrow margin. The DPP also won the parliamentary elections held on the same day.

Mutharika received 38.5% of the vote according to the Malawi Election Commission (MEC), the electoral body in charge of organizing and monitoring the election. The 78-year-old incumbent faced strong competition from his deputy and Vice President, Saulos Chilima (who received 20.3% of the vote) and a former Baptist preacher, Lazarus Chakwera (who received 35.4% of the vote).  

However, Chakwera and the Malawi Congress Party (MCP) have initiated a court case at the constitutional court in Lilongwe, claiming the DPP used correction fluid to alter the result sheets. Chilima’s United Transformation Movement has also joined the MCP’s legal battle. Last Friday, the court ruled in favor of opposition parties pursuing the case as protests erupted over alleged election fraud. The court set June 26 as the full hearing date.

Although Malawi has seen improved infrastructure and lowered inflation during Mutharika’s leadership since 2014, he has recently faced accusations of corruption and favoritism of his stronghold regions. Nicolus Dausi, member of DPP and former homeland minister, said about the electoral win: “We always knew that we were going to win because of the development President Mutharika has done in the last five years. We have another mandate for five years of development, peace and stability.”

The Malawian president, Peter Mutharika, arriving at a rally in Blantyre. Photograph: The Guardian, Thoko Chikondi/Associated Press.

The Malawian president, Peter Mutharika, arriving at a rally in Blantyre. Photograph: The Guardian, Thoko Chikondi/Associated Press.

Malawi is among the first countries in Africa to manage a peaceful transition of power from one ruling government to another post-independence in 1964. Since then, Malawi has relied heavily on foreign aid and humanitarian assistance. The country also suffers from extreme weather that has affected and displaced thousands of people in the past decade. Today, Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world and more than half of the country’s 17 million people live below the poverty line. Additionally, women remain seriously underrepresented in Malawi’s political sphere despite the commitment from political leaders to encourage greater female political participation.

A woman casts her vote at CCAP Primary School polling station during the Malawi Tripartite general elections in Mzuzu, on May 21, 2019. Photograph: Associated Foreign Press.

A woman casts her vote at CCAP Primary School polling station during the Malawi Tripartite general elections in Mzuzu, on May 21, 2019. Photograph: Associated Foreign Press.

Regardless of the outcome of the court case, Malawi’s President faces a significant responsibility to address the country’s pressing political, economic and environmental issues. Raising Malawi hopes for continued peace and renewed efforts to build better futures for all of Malawi’s citizens - particularly its orphans, vulnerable children, women, and people with albinism. 


Endnotes:

  1. 2019 Tripartite Election Results. Malawi Election Commission. https://www.mec.org.mw/elections/#/.

  2. 2019 Tripartite Election Results. Malawi Election Commission.  https://www.mec.org.mw/elections/#/.

  3. “Malawi’s Mutharika narrowly wins presidential race with 38.57% of the vote.” Reuters. https://reut.rs/2XgPtHh.

  4. United States Agency for International Development (USAID). https://www.usaid.gov/malawi.


From Lilongwe to NYC: Lazarus’ Tribeca Premiere & Debut Album

From Lilongwe to NYC: Lazarus’ Tribeca Premiere & Debut Album

In April 2019, Raising Malawi supported our dear friend Lazarus Chigwandali, a Malawian street musician with albinism, with a trip to New York City for the premiere of a documentary about his life at the Tribeca Film Festival. Executive produced by Madonna, the film Lazarus follows his journey to record his debut album and documents the challenges faced by people with albinism in Malawi. The film, directed by Oscar-nominated David Darg, garnered support from the United Nations, Amnesty International, Oxfam, the US Ambassador in Malawi and many others in the music and film industries!

April 29, 2019 - Front row from left: Clem Kwizombe (Filmmaker/Interpreter), Lazarus Chigwandali, Ikponwosa Ero, (the United Nations Independent Expert on the enjoyment of human rights by persons with albinism); Back row from left: David Darg (Director), Johan Hugo  (Album Producer) and Bryn Mooser (Film Producer). (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/Associated Press).

April 29, 2019 - Front row from left: Clem Kwizombe (Filmmaker/Interpreter), Lazarus Chigwandali, Ikponwosa Ero, (the United Nations Independent Expert on the enjoyment of human rights by persons with albinism); Back row from left: David Darg (Director), Johan Hugo (Album Producer) and Bryn Mooser (Film Producer). (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/Associated Press).

Persons with albinism face multiple forms of discrimination worldwide, including violence, which puts their security and lives at risk. In Malawi, where there are an estimated 10,000 people with albinism, many continue to face marginalization and social exclusion due to erroneous beliefs, myths and superstitions. From stigma and discrimination, to barriers in health, education and lack of visibility in social and political spheres, these challenges seriously undermine their enjoyment of human rights.


Despite facing tremendous adversity, Lazarus found solace in music at just 10 years old, writing and playing songs on a makeshift guitar with his younger brother. Since his first performance for a large crowd at the Lake of Stars Festival in Malawi last September, Lazarus has recorded his debut album, Stomp on the Devil. The album, which will be released in September 2019, aims to create social change for people with albinism in Africa. The first single from the sessions, “Ndife Alendo” (We Are Strangers), serves as a metaphor for the plight of people with albinism. “We are treated as if we are visitors in their own land,” said Lazarus. “I’m telling people, ‘We are human beings, just like you.”

Cover art for Lazarus’ single, “Ndife Alendo” (We Are Strangers).

Cover art for Lazarus’ single, “Ndife Alendo” (We Are Strangers).

He also recounts feeling proud about overcoming adversity and finding a calling through music: “For my family, it was one of the biggest moments in our lives. People could not believe how they used to see me walking down the streets and busking, and now there were producers and filmmakers recording these songs at my place. It was the most amazing feeling.”


We proudly recognize, celebrate and stand in solidarity with persons with albinism around the world. We applaud Lazarus not only for being a talented singer and musician, but for being a powerful voice for persons with albinism and a new generation in Malawi!

To learn more about Lazarus, his music and the documentary, visit:

https://www.lazarus-malawi.com/

https://www.tribecafilm.com/filmguide/lazarus-2019

UNICEF Partnership & Disaster Relief

UNICEF Partnership & Disaster Relief

Last month, severe flooding in Malawi damaged homes and infrastructure, claiming 56 lives and displacing 82,700 people. It was the worst natural disaster to hit the country since 2015, affecting more than 1 million Malawians. The President declared a state of emergency in 15 districts, with southern districts of Nsanje, Chikwawa, Phalombe and Zomba seeing the most destruction. In a country like Malawi, floods stifle development efforts at every level - from agriculture and water sanitation to education and the environment.

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In the aftermath of the disaster, Raising Malawi has partnered with UNICEF to support emergency response on the ground. UNICEF Malawi leads among development agencies in quickly mobilizing resources to minimize the impact of these events on families and children in flood zones.

Thanks to an effective model and broad network in Malawi, UNICEF representatives are among the first responders to reach people and assess their needs across sectors. UNICEF utilizes schools in each community as a base of operations and provides critical services such as clean water, sanitation facilities (essential to mitigate risk of cholera outbreaks), health services (including immunizations), food, temporary shelter and “pop-up” schools (volunteer teachers, supplies and shelters) so that kids can continue to learn.

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During the last major flood emergency, Raising Malawi supported UNICEF’s efforts to reach thousands of affected families and children. With Raising Malawi’s help following the 2015 floods, UNICEF:

  • Provided 220K people in disaster zones with clean water

  • Reached 1 million people with sanitation and hygiene education to mitigate the risks of cholera transmission

  • Provided 280K people with access to safe sanitation facilities

  • Provided 84K women and children with essential health services

  • Treated 23K children with malnutrition

  • Provided 194K children in disaster zones with temporary “pop-up” school structures, including supplies and volunteer teachers

In response to the March 2019 disaster, our friends at UNICEF are hard at work again to meet the humanitarian needs of families and children impacted by these floods. Raising Malawi is proud to support UNICEF and we applaud their important work to help families return to their homes and lives.

Lake of Stars - Long Term Impact

Lake of Stars - Long Term Impact

As part of Raising Malawi’s commitment to supporting the communities that host the Lake of Stars Festival, wood from last year's stages has been recycled & turned into 50 desks for Mikute primary school in Salima. Check out the video below of the process!

MERCY JAMES CENTRE SPOTLIGHT - CLEFT REPAIRS

A cleft is a gap in the mouth that didn't close during the early stages of pregnancy, and this kind of birth defect happens more often than you may realize. It is estimated that, worldwide, a child is born every 3 minutes with a cleft — about one in 500-750 births. Sometimes a cleft condition can be easy to see because it’s an opening in the lip. Sometimes it’s harder to tell if someone has a cleft because it’s an opening in the roof of their mouth (called the palate.)

With surgery, a child suffering from a cleft lip or cleft palate can have a brand-new, beautiful smile. Cleft repairs are offered by the skilled surgeons of Mercy James Centre usually by the time a baby is 3 months old, and that a cleft palate should be repaired between the ages of 12 and 18 months.  Here are before and afters from Mercy James Centre.


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CONGRATULATIONS TO STELLA JENASI (I AM BECAUSE WE ARE UPDATE)

Raising Malawi has supported Stella Jenasi with academic scholarships since she was in primary school. From secondary, school to university, to working as a nurse at Mercy James Centre - Stella is a part of the Raising Malawi family and we are so proud of what she has accomplished and the person she has become.

Stella is originally from Nsanje, southern region of Malawi, and this weekend the Raising Malawi team traveled to Nsanje to celebrate the wedding of Stella and her fiance (now husband) John! It was a traditional ceremony and the white wedding will be in 2019.

Congratulations Stella and John!!

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RAISING MALAWI BRINGS JACARANDA SCHOOL TO LAKE OF STARS

The latest Raising Malawi program, is supporting music and arts (drama, art, poetry, dance) instruction at Jacaranda School for Orphans.

Jacaranda students have long been a part of Raising Malawi, from painting murals in the Mercy James Centre (Tree of Life and Rebel Heart Playroom) to dancing with David Banda at the opening ceremony of Mercy James Centre. Our team is delighted to be expanding the arts programming at for the next generation of young people. A component of the arts support is sponsoring Jacaranda to perform at Lake of Stars (the largest music festival in Malawi) for 7000+ people. Check out the photos below from their performance!

About Jacaranda School

The Jacaranda School for Orphans, located outside of Limbe, Malawi, was founded by Marie Da Silva. The school and its supporting foundation are named after the jacaranda tree, a tree that blossomed outside the hospital window of Marie’s father who died in 1997. To Marie, the jacaranda tree symbolizes life, growth and hope, important symbols for her students, orphans and underprivileged children, for whom she aims to provide a future.
 
In 2002, while working as a nanny in the U.S., Marie learned that the school in her hometown was going to close. Knowing personally the affects of HIV/AIDS on families and children, she urged her mother to let the students gather and learn in their family home using Marie’s financial support from abroad. She wanted to provide the most vulnerable children, children who have lost one or both parents to HIV/AIDS, with a quality education and all the supportive services they need to thrive.
 
Marie now lives in Malawi and runs the school, which serves 400+ kids with her husband and Executive Director Luc Deschamps.

Mercy James Centre Update (December)

Mercy James Centre Update (December)

Less than 6 months after opening,  the Mercy James Centre team has

  • Performed 223 surgeries in the new theaters
  • Admitted 41 patients to the ICU
  • Seen 420 patients in the outpatient clinic
  • Admitted 256 patients to the ward

This September, we were also proud to welcome Stella Janasi as a nurse in the Mercy James Centre! Stella was featured in the original IABWA documentary and received scholarship support from Raising Malawi for her academics since then. 

 
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How Madonna is Raising Malawi - PEOPLE Magazine Feature

How Madonna is Raising Malawi - PEOPLE Magazine Feature

For this week’s issue of PEOPLE Magazine, Madonna invited PEOPLE to join her in Malawi on July 11, when she opened the Mercy James Centre for Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, the nation’s first pediatric surgery and intensive care unit. .

“I’m here to save lives,” Madonna of her work in Malawi, which this year Global Financial Magazine ranked as the sixth-poorest country in the world. “I don’t want to be the outsider that comes in. I want to help them help themselves.” 

READ MORE HERE

GRAND OPENING OF MERCY JAMES CENTRE

GRAND OPENING OF MERCY JAMES CENTRE

With a mission to lead the region in paediatric surgical and intensive care, the Mercy James Centre for Paediatric Surgery and Intensive Care (MJC) formally opened on July 11, 2017. The opening ceremony was led by His Excellency President Arthur Peter Mutharika and Raising Malawi’s founder, Madonna Ciccone. The event was attended by representatives from the Ministry of Health and Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital as well as partners and benefactors from around the world who traveled to Malawi to celebrate the milestone. His Excellency President Arthur Peter Mutharika and Madonna toured the Mercy James Centre, including the three operating theatres and Malawi’s first paediatric intensive care unit, and greeted patients in the 50- bed ward. Called the “pride of Malawi” by His Excellency, the opening ceremony was a celebration of the partnership between Malawi’s Ministry of Health and the global and local partners that made the Mercy James Centre possible. While the ceremonial opening was July 11 – the Mercy James Centre began accepting patients in early July. Since then, MJC’s paediatric surgery team has:

  • Performed 73 surgeries in the new theatres
  • Admitted 13 patients to the ICU
  • Seen 75 patients in the outpatient clinic
  • Admitted 238 patients to the ward
Mercy James and Madonna at the Opening Ceremony

Mercy James and Madonna at the Opening Ceremony

Front entrance of the Mercy James Centre 

Front entrance of the Mercy James Centre 

MAY 2017 - FINAL MURALS

MAY 2017 - FINAL MURALS

We are so grateful to all of the talented artist who donated their time and expertise to make sure that the walls of the Mercy James Centre were inviting and that we had a warm, calming environment for children. Check out photo of the final murals and the wonderful muralists below. 

IABWA SPOTLIGHT: STELLA JANASI

IABWA SPOTLIGHT: STELLA JANASI

Raising Malawi first met Stella when she was a teenager. We were amazed by how dedicated she was to continuing her education, despite being orphaned.

Updates from Home of Hope

Updates from Home of Hope

Home of Hope Orphanage is starting the year with more children than ever in its care – 750! Last year, Home of Hope started several new projects to further support children and young adults at the home. Read more.

An Evening of Art, Music and Mischief

An Evening of Art, Music and Mischief

An Evening of Art, Mischief, and Music raised an extraordinary $7.5 million dollars for Raising Malawi on December 2, 2016 in Miami. The event featured a live auction where guests bid on art and experiences, followed by a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see Madonna perform in a very intimate setting. The event brought together a dynamic group of 450 Raising Malawi supporters, fans, art collectors, and philanthropists to support Raising Malawi and its project to construct Malawi’s first pediatric surgery and intensive care unit.

An emotional moment from the evening came when Dr. Eric Borgstein, the Head of Pediatric Surgery at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) and long-term Raising Malawi partner, spoke to guests about poverty in Malawi – where the average person lives on less than $2 per day. He explained the challenges of treating children in need of critical surgeries in this environment. His remarks were followed by a video (below) featuring the remarkable work made possible by Raising Malawi’s partnership and support from the guests in the room.

Madonna’s son David Banda also took the stage to talk about the challenges facing his birth country of Malawi and his living conditions when Madonna rescued him from an orphanage at the age of two. Recognizing that he was one of the lucky ones, he asked guests to open their hearts to support his brothers and sisters who remain in Malawi.

All proceeds from the evening will benefit Raising Malawi’s ongoing work in the country, including the organization’s ambitious project to build and help operate Malawi’s first pediatric surgery and intensive care unit. The new facility, named the Mercy James Institute for Pediatric Surgery and Intensive Care, is set to open in 2017 and will double the number of life-saving surgeries performed on children each year, provide intensive care after critical surgeries, and train specialized Malawian medical staff. In a country with only four pediatric surgeons and where 50% of the population is under the age of 15, this new facility will transform the lives of Malawian children.

1. Madonna performing on chair, Getty Entertainment
2. Madonna posing, Jeff Kravitz
3. David, Madonna, and Dr. Borgstein, Jeff Kravitz
4. David speaking, Jeff Kravitz
5. Madonna performing, Getty Entertainment
6. An Evening of Art, Mischief and Music auction booklets, Getty Entertainment
7. Madonna kneeling during performance, Jeff Kravitz
8. Table at An Evening of Art, Mischief and Music, Getty Entertainment

Enter #MuralsforMalawi

Enter #MuralsforMalawi

UPDATE: Thank you to everyone who submitted art or tagged an artist! The first artist selected to paint a mural is Wanderson Pereira from Brazil! We are finalizing our selections and will be announcing the winners throughout the upcoming weeks.

July Malawi Trip

The Raising Malawi team has returned from visiting our project to construct a paediatric surgery and intensive care unit at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH).